All you need to know about Echeveria succulents.

Echeveria succulents, echeveria setosa, echeveria laui, echeveria lilacina, echeveria peacockii, echeveria flower, echeveria propagation, echeveria cheyenne, echeveria succulent types

Echeveria succulents, echeveria setosa, echeveria laui, echeveria lilacina, echeveria peacockii, echeveria flower, echeveria propagation, echeveria cheyenne, echeveria succulent types

What is an Echeveria Succulent?

Echeveria is the name for a huge collection of flowering Echeveria succulents, with an estimated 150 different varieties, but all with their distinctive rosette shape. In the wild, they’re native to semi-desert regions of South and Central America and Mexico

How do you care for Echeveria

Thinking about where they originate from, it’s easy to understand why these beautiful plants aren’t a big fan of the cold. They like plenty of sun, however intense summer sun can burn their leaves, so during the warmer months, you might want to move them away from the window sill. When you water Echeveria, go for the soil, and not the plant. Don’t let them become bone dry, this can damage the roots. At the same time, soggy soil can cause rot. A rule of thumb is to allow the soil to dry out between waterings

Things to look out for

Echeveria succulents will flower and seed many times over the course of their lifetime. The brightly coloured flowers will form on the end of long stalks which shoot out from the rosette, they last several weeks before fading. The stalk will eventually brown, and can be nipped off, or left. Echeveria propagate by cloning themselves, creating offsets. They are part of a group of plants often nicknamed “Hens and Chicks”, the main plant being the hen, and the surrounding babies the chicks.

An Echeveria succulent having ‘babies’ and creating clones.

An Echeveria succulent having ‘babies’ and creating clones.

How do we use them at Heron Hawker

We use Echeveria succulents to bring colour, and height variety to our succulent terrariums. They’re one of the most popular plants in our terrarium workshops, and look great nestled amongst pebbles, rocks, or sand. We cluster them for larger builds, equally they sit just as pretty on their own, in a smaller vessel. Succulents make great plants for open terrariums. If you want to have a go at building your own succulent terrarium, why not buy a terrarium workshop ticket with us.

Succulent Terrarium

Want to buy an echeveria succulent terrarium? You can order a terrarium from us here at Heron Hawker.